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Today is  Friday, October 24, 2014


Converting Spares...How do I do it?.
.

Probably the most commonly asked question about bowling is how to convert spares. There's a lot of controversy about which is more important, getting spares or getting more strikes. The average bowler, through the course of an average game will have the opportunity to convert spares twice as much as the probability of getting a strike. Regardless of the skill level of your bowling, missing spares will definitely lower your game and most likely, affect your attitude. Obviously there is nothing more frustrating than stringing three or four strikes and then following up by missing several easy spares.

Pamela Fitts (L621035@LMSC5.IS.LMSC.LOCKHEED.COM) provides the following tutorial on almost any condition you may encounter to convert spares. Although the tutorial is directed toward the newer bowler, the advise she offers is applicable to the most experienced bowler.

This mini-tutorial is for the newer bowler, who has a consistent armswing...

The 3-6-9 System. This is the standard method for converting spares. The success in using it is based on these points: bowlers need a consistent delivery; bowlers can roll the ball where they are aiming; bowlers start their first ball deliver from about the same place on the approach each time; and bowlers usually aim for the 2nd arrow as their strike target. When preparing to convert spares, bowlers move a certain number of boards right or left, depending on which pins remain standing. Adjustments begin at the starting place for the strike ball delivery.

 The pin closest to the bowler is the key pin. It governs decision making. It must be the first pin hit. The exceptions to this, of course, is when 2, 3, or 4 pins stand side by side. For instance, when the 4 - 5 pin spare is standing, the key pin is where the 2 pin would've been standing. The 3-6-9 system is applied like this for right handed bowlers. When the key pin is the 2 pin, bowlers move Three boards to the right, & roll the ball over the same target area used for the strike ball. When the key pin is the 4 pin, bowlers move Six boards to the right, & roll over the same target used for the strike ball. When the target is the 7 pin, bowlers move over Nine boards to the right, & roll over the same target for their strike ball. When remaining pins stand to the right of the head pin, adjustments start, not from the strike ball position, but from the position where the 10 pin spare is converted. Through trial & error, bowlers will move about 15 boards left to find the starting place where they can roll the ball over the 3rd arrow, & constantly knock down the 10 pin. This is your Starting board. Now, use the same 3-6-9 system. When the 6 pin is the key pin, move Three boards to the right of the 10 pin starting place, & roll the ball over the same 3rd arrow.

 

Right Handed Bowler for Pins Left of the Center

     2 pin is the key pin = move 3 boards right
     4 pin is the key pin = move 6 boards right
     7 pin is the key pin = move 9 boards right
     Right Handed Bowler for Pins Right of the Center

     10 pin is the key pin = 3rd arrow, find the board
     6 pin is the key pin = move 3 boards right
     3 pin is the key pin = move 6 boards right
     Left Handed Bowler for Pins Right of the Center
(straight roller)
     3 is the key pin = move 3 boards left
     6 is the key pin = move 6 boards left
    10 is the key pin = move 9 boards left
     Left Handed Bowler for Pins Left of the Center
(straight roller)
    7 is the key pin = 3rd arrow, find the board
    4 is the key pin = move 3 boards left
    2 is the key pin = move 6 boards left

2-4-6 for left-handers. Left handed bowlers who start from the far left side of the approach can use the 2-4-6 system. When the key is the 3 pin, bowlers move the TARGET two boards right. When the key pin is the 6 pin, move the TARGET four boards right. When the key pin is the 10 pin, move the TARGET Arrow six boards right. Move the target, but keep the starting place constant. Right handers who like to play this outside line, like the 5 board, can use the 2-4-6 system.

Additionally, the following insight into adjusting your mark to pick up most (if not all) common spares was provided by Steve O'Brien (SJO103@psuvm.psu.edu)

 

If you have been missing spares recently, try this method. Its called the 3-6-9 method. in order for it to consistently work for you, you need a consistent delivery.

Here is how it works: If you leave the 2 pin, move 3 boards to the right on the approach and release the ball over your strike target.

If you leave the 4 or 8 pin, move 6 boards to the right on the approach and release the ball over your strike target.

If you leave the 7 pin, move 9 boards to the right on the approach and release the ball over your strike target.

Now for the 3,6,9,and 10 pins: Find where to stand on the approach for the ten pin, after you have found this position you can use the system to convert the 3,6,and 9 pin.

If you leave the 6 or 9 pin, move 3 boards to the right on the approach and release the ball over your 10 pin target.

If you leave the 3 pin, move 6 boards to the right on the approach and release the ball over your 10 pin target.

This method will work on all lane conditions barring excessive oil that has carried down from the headers to the mid-lane or extremely dry conditions. You may have to adjust it to a 4-8-12 system on extreme oil. As long as your hand position is consistent at your release and your ball speed is the same, this should work about 95% of the time.

 

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